Cambus

1 Introduce the text you are going to discuss in your paper and spell correctly
2 Thesis – present the claim you are making about the text
3 You are only interested in the aspect of the text that your paper will be arguing
NO: summaries, plots, retellings, bios, book reports
NO: praising of the text and praising of the author
3 Use MLA format to refer to the text and the author throughtout your essay
if you are writing on a short story, it should be capitalized and in quotation marks
if you are writing on a novel or a play, it should only be in Italics
4 your INTRO has to answer the following question:
WHAT DO YOUR ARGUE about the text?
Do not state the obvious
ask yourself: do I know this because I read the text?
If the answer is “yes,” you have a descriptive idea,
AND you need to look for a new one
* TO FIND YOUR ARGUMENT SPEND TIME RE-READING THE TEXT
** Look for quotes that stand out to you, that you want to talk about
*** Start discussing these quotes; identify several interconnected themes
5 How do you plan on proving/defending your argument? Your thesis?
Establish cause and effect
Make a bigger claim
NO quotes in the intro
Analytical INTRO
A. IDENITIFY 3-4 main issues that have to be discussed to prove your thesis
how? brainstorm; this will change; do not get attached to the form of the essay; stay with ideas
B. Discuss one point in a paragraph.
NO: summaries, plots, retellings, bios, book reports
NO: praising of the text and praising of the author
TR Make sure to write a transition sentence to connect the previous paragraph with the new one
Ask yourself: what do I agrue in this section of my paper?
What do I need to talk about to prove it? What quotes can I use and discuss?
Use the quotes to support your claims. Discuss each short quote.
quotes if you have a quote that you like, but it does not really follow your previous discussion,
it is necessary to ask a new question: how does this quote help me prove my argument?
DOES this quote help me prove my argument?
The quote does not speak for itself; you have to discuss it
* each paragraph should have a new argumentative sub-point
** all body paragraphs together speak to the claim you announce in your intro
*** start fresh: blank sheet – only new quotes and new themes (if lost – take a brake/ start again)
C. Checklist for each paragraph:
TR?
why do you use these quotes?
Do you discuss the quotes enough? Beyond the obvious?
Establish cause and effect
Make a bigger claim
Proofread, MLA guidelines, commas, capitalization
BODY Paragraphs:
A. READ your intro again: did your paper argue what your intro promised to?
edit the intro to match the body paragraphs
B. NEVER use “in conclusion” to open up your last paragraph!!
NO: summaries, plots, retellings, bios, book reports
NO: praising of the text and praising of the author
C. Re-establish cause and effect of your argument
D. Make a bigger claim
E. Maybe: a closing remark.
Do not introduce new ideas/points in your final paragraph
Do not use new quotes in your last paragraph
Instead: draw on everything that has already been introduced and discussed, revealing a larger picture

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