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Assessment – Viva Voce: You need to attend a viva voce lasting 15 minutes that evidences your understanding of business operations and management.


Assignment

For this module you will complete two assignments:
Assignments must be submitted to BMM3003 via Turnitin by 12.00 noon on
the deadline day.
Semester 1 – Assessment 1
The first will be a report based on a case study (2000 words) evaluating the operations
and management decisions of a company of your choice.
Assessment – Case Study: You are required to complete a case study based on a
company of your choice (2000 words). The case study report should provide;
 An introduction including an explanation of what business operations means
 An explanation of the main functions of business operations
 A brief description of your chosen company
 An evaluation of the company’s operations management decisions: Production,
Supply chain, logistics, location strategies, quality control and HR
 A conclusion bringing together your findings
Semester 2 – Assessment 2
The second will be a Viva-Voce (15 minutes) an opportunity for you to talk through with
your tutor, the key concepts of effective operations strategy and the role and scope of
business management.
Assessment – Viva Voce: You need to attend a viva voce lasting 15 minutes that
evidences your understanding of business operations and management. This will be a
discussion conversation, so you will NOT need to prepare a presentation. The viva will
be recorded for second marking purposes.
Make sure you can discuss:
 The functions of business operations; Production, Supply chain, logistics,
location strategies, quality control and HR
 What role managers have in effective operations
 The difference between leadership and management
 What makes a good manager
 How managers can influence organisational culture
 Employee management; recruitment and retention
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is a form of cheating which involves presenting another person’s ideas or
expressions without acknowledging the source. The penalties for this are severe.
Extensive and repeated instances can result in your removal from the degree
programme. It is therefore very important that you understand how to avoid being
accused of plagiarism. Any work submitted for assessment must, unless
collaborative work has been specifically permitted in the assignment guidelines, be
your own work. Any material used, from whatever source, must be clearly
acknowledged. Any words that are not your own should be shown as quotes and
their author and publication details given. Where you paraphrase the words of
another you should make this clear and give details of where you found this material.
You should make use of the referencing guidelines on the Library website and
complete the online plagiarism tutorial to ensure that you are providing such details
correctly https://lib.leedstrinity.ac.uk/iguana/www.main.cls?surl=Referencing Doing
so will gain you marks for showing evidence of research and ability to reference. Not
doing so could lead to accusations of plagiarism. You can also use Turnitin in
advance of the deadline to enable you to check for elements of plagiarism in your
work and then correct these.
Students will be made aware of how to avoid plagiarism as part of the induction
process and within the initial stages of the programme of study, as well as how to
incorporate correct referencing into their written work. The library provides
Referencing Guides, online tutorials and one-to-one support. Students can also
obtain advice on appropriate academic conventions from the Learning Hub and
advice on a specific piece of assessment is available from the module tutor.
As is a form of dishonesty which is viewed by the University as a serious offence.
The University’s Regulations contain provisions by which the Examination Board
may penalise students who are found to have presented plagiarised work for
assessment. The purpose of this statement is to explain what plagiarism is. Further
information about the procedures which are followed where allegations of plagiarism
are made, together with the penalties that may be imposed, can be found in the
above Regulations.
Plagiarism consists of presenting someone else’s work as your own. Some
examples of plagiarism are:
 reproducing or paraphrasing published material without acknowledgement of
the source
 copying from the work of another student
 undeclared collusion with another student
 getting someone else to do your work for you
This is not an exhaustive list. There are clearly degrees of plagiarism, particularly
where published work is concerned. At one extreme there may be a very short
section of a coursework which is copied without being properly referenced; at the
other extreme a coursework may consist almost entirely of copied work.
Students who are found to have colluded in making their work available to be copied
by others will not themselves be deemed to have committed plagiarism but will be
dealt with under the student disciplinary procedures described in the Students’
Handbook of Regulations. Similarly, disciplinary action will be taken against any
student who is found to have undertaken a coursework on behalf of another.
Submission Formats
All assignments should be submitted through TURNITIN to Moodle whenever
possible. If necessary, for the nature of the work, alternative methods may be used.
For each piece of assessment, the assignment (or assessment) brief will indicate the
method of submission. Students should be advised to retain a copy of their
submitted assignment (or assessment) however submitted, where practicable e.g.
this may not be possible with artefacts.
Penalties for Late Submissions
 If you submit coursework after the given deadline, or agreed deadline
extension, your submission will be marked as a fail.
 If you submit coursework after the given deadline, you may also ask that we
excuse your lateness. We will consider such requests in accordance with the
Mitigating Circumstances Policy and Procedure. The tests we will use are:
a. your late submission was for a good reason, and
b. you could not reasonably have asked for an extension before the deadline.
 In any event, coursework submitted more than five days after the original
deadline, or any agreed extension, will not be marked, and will be counted as
a failure. This helps us to keep track of all the work that has to be marked and
returned to students
Please note all coursework for the Foundation Year is marked on a pass/fail basis.
Where coursework is marked on a pass/fail basis and it is submitted late then it will
automatically be deemed to be a fail and will be awarded a mark of zero.
Therefore, late submission of Foundation Year coursework should be avoided
at all costs, as assignments will be automatically failed.
Marking Scheme / Criteria
Internal examiners, within a programme team, are responsible for the setting,
internal marking and internal moderation of assessments – they may standardise,
first mark, sample and double mark assessments. First markers must provide, for
each piece of work presented for assessment, comments outlining the reasons for
the mark awarded. Internal examiners submit marks to the Assessment Panel
responsible for the module concerned.
Assignment Criteria/Marking Schemes/Marking Criteria
 Coursework is marked by internal examiners against the focused assignment
(or assessment) criteria, the marking scheme and the marking criteria, as
defined within the assignment brief.
 Examinations are marked by internal examiners against the focused
assessment criteria, the marking scheme and the generic marking descriptors
We will assess your achievement of the learning outcomes for the programme in
each year. Programme schemes will set out the assessment framework. This will
take one of the following forms:
a. Assessment associated with each module individually; combined to form an
overall judgement.
b. Integrated assessments associated with all the material covered.
The relevant Assessment Panel will consider your results and the marks to be
awarded.
If you fail an assessment you may resit the assessment twice.
Assessment Criteria
Assessment 1:
Mark criterion 1: You should demonstrate the ability to discuss content relating to
business operations and management
Topics may include: Operational strategy, Production management, Supply chain
management, logistics management, location strategies, quality control, leadership
and HR and people management.
Mark criterion 2: You should apply content to a specific case study to demonstrate
your ability to contextualise theoretical knowledge to a real-world scenario.
Mark criterion 3: You should present a well-structured report consistent with report
writing.
Mark criterion 4: You must draw upon academic sources and reference your work.
Assessment 2:
Mark criterion 1: You should demonstrate the ability to talk about the concepts and
functions relating to business operations and business management. Discussions
and explanations should demonstrate your understanding of the key concepts of
effective operations strategy and the role and scope of business management.
Mark criterion 2: You must provide real-business examples to demonstrate you
understanding of key concepts.
Mark criterion 3: You need to make sure you can confidently articulate responses
to questions and hold a verbal discussion around the key concepts relating to
business operations and management.
Mark criterion 4: You should demonstrate that you have read and can discuss
relevant material from a variety of academic and professional sources.
Marking Criteria Grid: Foundation Year (non-practical)
Criterion Pass Fail
Mark
criterion 1
You have demonstrated the
ability to present module
specific content effectively to
an appropriate audience.
You have not demonstrated the ability
to present module specific content
effectively to an appropriate audience.
Mark
criterion 2
You have sufficiently employed
academic skills and
conventions to achieve the
learning objective(s) that the
task assesses.
You have not sufficiently employed
academic skills and conventions to
achieve the learning objective(s) that
the task assesses.
Mark
criterion 3
You have managed to present
a well-structured piece of
assessment work.
You have not managed to present a
well-structured piece of assessment
work.
Mark
criterion 4
Your work draws upon
academic sources in an
appropriate way.
Your work does not draw upon
academic sources in an appropriate
way.

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