Women Suffrage

AMH 2020 Research Paper 1
Description
The first research paper will be due on Saturday, October 17 at 11:59pm via the Canvas Turnitin
Dropbox. The completed submission must be four pages of text (this does not include the title
page and the Works Cited page). All citations must be completed in the Chicago Manual of Style
citation style. The topic of Research Paper 1 will be on the Women’s Suffrage Movement. You will
be given four primary sources and two secondary sources to use for the completion of this paper.
You may complete additional research and elect to use those sources in your paper. However, you
may not use more than four primary sources and two secondary sources in your final
submission.
Developing a Thesis

  • You need to begin thinking of a thesis for your paper and you should come up with a series
    of interrelated questions that will direct your research. Your thesis provides an argument,
    which you support with proper evidence from your research.
  • Where you start and where you end up can be different places, so do not think that you
    have to stick to your original thesis. If you find some avenues limited and others plentiful, so
    be it; that is part of the job. But whatever topic you pick, you need to know what questions
    you want to try to answer. For the purpose of this research paper, consider the following
    questions:
  • Who were the women who devoted their lives to the Women’s Suffrage Movement?
  • Why were some areas in the United States more likely to grant women the right to
    vote before other areas?
  • Was the fight for Women’s Suffrage simply a battle of the sexes?
  • What was some of the opposition to the movement? Was the opposition strictly
    from males?
    Primary and Secondary Sources
  • Primary sources provide a first-hand account of an event or time period and are considered
    to be authoritative. They represent original thinking, reports on discoveries or events, or
    they can share new information. Often these sources are created at the time the events
    occurred but they can also include sources that are created later. They are usually the first
    formal appearance of original research.
  • Examples of primary sources include:
  • diaries, correspondence, ships’ logs
  • original documents e.g. birth certificates, trial transcripts
  • biographies, autobiographies, manuscripts
  • interviews, speeches, oral histories
  • case law, legislation, regulations, constitutions
  • government documents, statistical data, research reports
  • a journal article reporting NEW research or findings
  • creative art works, literature
  • newspaper advertisements and reportage and editorial/opinion pieces
  • Secondary sources offer an analysis, interpretation or a restatement of primary sources and
    are considered to be persuasive. They often involve generalisation, synthesis, interpretation,
    commentary or evaluation in an attempt to convince the reader of the creator’s argument.
    They often attempt to describe or explain primary sources.
  • Examples of secondary sources include:
  • journal articles that comment on or analyse research
  • textbooks
  • dictionaries and encyclopaedias
  • books that interpret, analyse
  • political commentary
  • biographies
  • dissertations
  • newspaper editorial/opinion pieces
  • criticism of literature, art works or music
  • On the course Canvas page under the Research Paper 1 Module, there are four primary
    and two secondary sources that can be used for your paper. You are not required to
    complete any additional research, however, you may elect to do so. Your completed paper
    and works cited page must include a total of four primary sources and two secondary
    sources. Please consult the information above regarding the difference between primary
    and secondary sources if you choose to complete additional research.
    Research Paper 1: Rubric
  • Below you will find a description of papers that would earn each grade. Note that these
    descriptions are only approximations; a paper does not necessarily have to have all the
    problems listed next to the D grade in order to qualify, but it will generally have one or
    more.
    A ● A well composed introduction and thesis statement.
    ● A well-organized presentation of the argument.
    ● A well written paper largely free of grammatical or spelling errors.
    ● A clearly worded conclusion that fulfills the promise of the thesis statement.
    ● Evidence that the student is actively engaged, either by synthesizing the material in an effective
    way or by evaluating material given to them.
    ● All components of assignment is complete.
    ● Footnotes and works cited page are completed and in the correct Chicago Manual of Style
    format.
    ● Paper is the required 4 pages of text.
    ● Paper includes a proper cover page and a works cited page.
    B ● An effort at an introduction and thesis, though the introduction may lack purpose and the
    thesis may be vague.
    ● A clear argument, though its presentation may require some work to make it better organized
    or more effective.
    ● A discussion of material and citation of evidence that is appropriate to the argument.
    ● Perhaps a number of grammatical and spelling errors.
    ● A conclusion that clearly reflects the readings.
    ● Signs that the student has mastered the basic material, though perhaps has not been actively
    engaged with it enough to earn an A.
    ● Missing some of the required components of the assignment.
    ● Some citation errors in the footnotes and bibliography.
    ● Footnotes and works cited page are in the Chicago Manual of Style format.
    ● Paper is the required 4 pages of text.
    ● Paper includes a proper cover page and works cited page.
    C ● An inadequate introduction and thesis.
    ● Lack of a clear argument.
    ● Failure to mention topics clearly relevant to the question.
    ● Numerous grammatical and/or spelling errors.
    ● A sketchy conclusion which may not be a completely accurate reflection of the reading and
    lecture material.
    ● Evidence that the student has failed to master the basic material, though perhaps has hit many
    of the important points.
    ● Statements that seem to fulfill the assignment but do not advance the question or show
    thoughtful analysis.
    ● Missing many components of the assignment.
    ● Many citation errors in footnote and bibliography.
    ● Footnotes and works cited page are not in the Chicago Manual of Style format.
    ● Paper is not the required 4 pages of text.
    ● Paper does not include a proper cover page and works cited page.
    D ● A complete lack of introduction or thesis.
    ● No real argument.
    ● Material is covered in a disorganized and sketchy fashion at best.
    ● Poorly written, with many errors and lots of sloppiness.
    ● Evidence that the student has failed to tackle the question at hand.
    ● Student did not take the time to complete a majority of the required components of the
    assignment.
    ● Citations are sloppy.
    ● Footnotes and works cited page are not in the Chicago Manual of Style format.
    ● Paper is not the required 4 pages of text.
    ● Paper does not include a proper cover page and works cited page.
    F ● A failure to complete the assignment in any meaningful way, which could mean not even
    addressing the question at hand, or providing an essay that is just simply wrong in many crucial
    respects, or is presented at such a level of incompetence that it could earn nothing better than
    an F.
    ● The paper does not include footnotes in Chicago Manual of Style format.
    ● The paper does not include a works cited page in Chicago Manual of Style format.
    ● The student has plagiarized.
    ● Footnotes and works cited page are not in the Chicago Manual of Style format.
    ● Paper is not the required 4 pages of text.
    ● Paper does not include a proper cover page and works cited page.

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