Christians Should Use Imprecatory Psalms as A Model For Prayer

Christians Should Use Imprecatory Psalms as A Model For Prayer

Introduction

The question of whether to allow David’s imprecations to be used in prayers today has clouded the minds of many especially the Christians who use this book most of the time. Though many people have debated about this, some giving negative thoughts while others are expressing their optimism vividly, I want to take a stand and talk of the point of discussion which is God’s vengeance on the enemies of David. David the servant of the most high God and a man after God’s heart went through a lot of challenges, though he expressed a lot of bitterness on his enemies and prayed more to God to help him punish them, but he also showed mercy and actually mourned the death of Saul, his enemy in (2 Samuel chapter one).

The mind of David as far as justice is concerned was so different with the perceptions running around. First, David used these imprecations for the honor and fear of the almighty and sovereign God. He wanted to tell people that there is a God who judges the earth exist and he is the one who has the right to exercise justice. When we look back in the old Testament, we find a lot of injustice occurring in the land such as the innocent being murdered, the poor and the weak in the society such as the story of Naboth and King Ahab in the 1 Kings 21 being threatened and living a miserable life.The imprecatory comes with a solution that we should not take vengeance in our hands but leave it to God who has the power to exercise the right justice to his people, and that is why he laments to God to remember his enemies who were after his life. This idea is also confirmed in the new testament context such as in the book of (Romans 12:19) that we should not take revenge in our hands, not unless we want to incur the wrath of God (Broyles, 1999).

David who is the principle author of this book was known by his attributes like rage, anger and sometimes revenge as have earlier on stated above. Despite this, he was also known as a man of Repentance. In fact, in the whole Bible, there is no man who repented more than the imprecatory. Therefore, David’s acts of repentance overrule the negativities seen by people because the ultimate end to this sinful nature is repentance (Hassell, 2001). The bible says in the book of (Romans 3:23) that all men have sinned and had fallen short of the glory of GOD, this tells us that though David was sometimes into sin, he often goes on his knees and repent. This gives us a clear lesson that we should not feel guilty of our sin, but we should always go on our knees and pray.

We should understand that a man jotted this book under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. This is confirmed by the testimony of David and his greater son written in (2 Samuel 23, Mark 12:36), apart from the book of Psalms, David takes part in the writing in the book of Samuel where he was writing under the influence of the Holy Spirit. This one tells us that we should not despise the writing in the books of Psalms, but we should accept the words because they were not of him but from above. And Peter’s quotation from both Psalms 69 and 109, the two of the most common of the imprecatory psalms is introduced by the statements that these scriptures had to happen such as the Holy Spirit by the mouth of David concerning Judas (Belcher, 2006).

Conclusion

Though the imprecatory psalms may seem to be an outburst of evil emotions as written at the beginning of the psalms the scripture does not explain the reason for this feeling and why it is included in the Bible. So, what we should understand is that everything written in the Bible does not have errors but is perfect and has good implications in our life. Let us all embrace positivity as far this book is concerned, and we should also not judge our friends and mostly those who took part in the writing of this holy book.

Work cited

Belcher, Richard P. (2006). The Messiah and the Psalms: Preaching Christ from All of the Psalms. Fearn, Scotland: Mentor Imprint. ISBN: 9781845500740.

Broyles, Craig C. (1999). Psalms: Volume II in New International Bible Commentary. Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers. 1999. ISBN: 9780801045752.

Bullock, C. Hassell. (2001). Encountering the Book of Psalms: A Literary and Theological Introduction. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic. ISBN: 9780801027956.

Reference

Belcher, Richard P. (2006). The Messiah and the Psalms: Preaching Christ from All the Psalms. Fearn, Scotland: Mentor Imprint. ISBN: 9781845500740.

Broyles, Craig C. (1999). Psalms: Volume II in New International Bible Commentary. Peabody, Massachusetts: Hendrickson Publishers. 1999. ISBN: 9780801045752.

Bullock, C. Hassell. (2001). Encountering the Book of Psalms: A Literary and Theological Introduction. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic. ISBN: 9780801027956.