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When creating your own Personal and Professional Development Plan, it is essential to make sure it accurately outlines your personal goals

• When creating your own Personal and Professional Development Plan, it is essential to make sure it accurately outlines your personal goals, why they are important to you, and how you plan to achieve them.
• Although all PPDs are specific to each individual, the plan will generally detail your ideal future based on your
short and/or long-term ambitions. Areas of development will be specific to you, and could be centred on work,
education, or self-improvement.
• It should also always recognise the potential obstacles you might face, and how you propose to overcome them
– and if the roadblocks cannot be tackled, include a contingency plan to help your career keep moving forward.
• Word count is 3000 (+/- 10%)

  1. Title page
  2. Executive Summary
  3. Table of contents
  4.  Introduction (200 words max)
  5. Main body:
  6. Task 1      -Define PPD

                    -PPD Planning Process

                    -Apply the PPD Process to your own development

                   -Apply theory and make sure they are all referenced.

  • Task 2    – Reflect on the issues/challenges arising from the PPD Plan
  • Task 3- Reflective practice- consider the development of transferable/employability skills based on engagement in CPPD activities and your programme of learning.  

5. Conclusions (200 words max)

6. Reference List (Harvard style) —    11 Different sources

7. Appendix- A-PPD Plan

                       B-Results VARK Questionnaire

                       C-Results from Belbin Questionnaire etc.

                                                                        PPD PLAN

  • Establish the purpose direction
  • Identify development needs
  • Look at the development opportunities
  • Formulate action plan
  • Undertake development
  • Record outcomes
  • Review and evaluate
  • You are required to write a Personal and Professional Development (PPD) Plan for yourself.
  • The plan is a written account of self-reflection and improvement, which should also provide a detailed action plan used to fulfil academic, personal, or career-based goals
  • You must recognise your strengths and weaknesses and establish aims and objectives to help identify the need for improvement.
  • Your plan should consist of your own personalised CPPD (Continuous Professional Personal Development) that will help you to objectively Identify any new goals you may have set and outline changes made to your plan based on your evaluation    (LO2, LO3)
  • Reflect on your personal and professional development to identify the transferable/ employability skills you have developed over the duration of the course. Consider how the development of these skills will enable you to be successful on the course and within the workplace.  (LO4)
  • Personal Professional development is the growth in personal qualities, technical skills and soft skills that improve a person’s performance and capabilities in a workplace or career.
  • Companies value professional development for overall growth in the capabilities of their workers.
  •  Employees use professional development to enhance performance and career mobility
  • Personal Professional development is the growth in personal qualities, technical skills and soft skills that improve a person’s performance and capabilities in a workplace or career.
  • Companies value professional development for overall growth in the capabilities of their workers.
  •  Employees use professional development to enhance performance and career mobility
  • Appendix: Personal Development Plan (PDP)
Name:    Desired Position:
Career Mission Statement:    
Major Career Goals:
Goal 1:     Target Date: 
Goal 2:     Target Date: 
Goal 3:     Target Date: 
Goal 4:     Target Date: 
SMART Objectives (What are my development objectives)Priority (High; medium or low in importance)Success Criteria (How will I recognise success?)ActionsResources (Required to achieve objectives)Target date (for achieving my objective)Challenges expected/Solutions
           
           
           
           
           
           
           

Goals and Objectives:

  •  Goals are broad, brief statements of intent that provide focus or vision for planning, Goals are warm and fuzzy.

Objectives:

  • Objectives are meant to be realistic targets; Objectives are written in an active tense and use strong verbs like to plan; to write; to conduct; to produce etc.
  • Objectives can help you focus towards achieving the goal

Please consider relevant theory to understand the importance of setting SMART Goals:

  • Goal Setting Theory
  • Dr Edwin Locke and Dr Gary Latham researched the theory of Goal Setting, during which time they identified five elements that need to be in place for us to achieve our goals.
  • Clarity, Challenge, Commitment, Feedback, Task complexity

SMART Goals:

  • Goals Motivate
  • The main purpose of PPD is to improve upon weaknesses in order to successfully achieve an individual’s goals set (Jobs, 2016).
  • Set yourself challenging goals that are SMART
  • A Personal Reflection of your skills or from Peer Review

What skills do you have?

  • Communication skills – speaking/listening/ Writing, Collaborative/Teamwork skills
  • Confidence, Problem solving skills, Leadership skills, Motivation skills, ICT skills
  • Higher Education (HE) Skills:
  • What skills do you need to study on a HE courses?
  • Comanaging your time and developing learning strategies, reading academic texts critically and effectively, Taking notes in lectures and from hard or electronic copy
  • Planning and writing essays and reports, Constructing, and presenting bibliographies and references, Developing an academic writing style
  • Improving spelling and grammar, Preparing, and delivering presentations, Revising, and sitting examinations, (Oxford University, 2020), Where are your gaps?

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